Archive for the ‘Arts and Crafts ~ Medieval Style’ Category

Halloween Costumes ~ Arts & Crafts Medieval Style

September 14, 2010

Good eventide to you all!

 September is all but half over and before we know it Halloween will be a-knocking.  Whether you need a costume for yourself to wear to a party or to wear when taking your kids to a party or maybe it’s a costume for your kids, our favorite time in history offers way too many choices.  TMC’s time period is from 476 A.D. to 1603 A.D.–that’s a lot of clothing changes!  I thought it would be fun to offer suggestions and provide links to websites that could help.  After doing a wee bit of research to find a few good ones I decided that I couldn’t do it all in one blog without turning the blog into a thesis!  Sooo…  I’m going to be blogging about costumes during the next week or so. 

 To begin, let’s start with what may be the easier patterns to find.  Those from Simplicity, Butterick, McCall and Vogue that are found in fabric stores.  These are great for those of you who are not interested in a historically accurate costume.  And don’t think you will have to pay full price for a pattern because just about every fabric store today has their patterns on sale for very little.  Nor does the fabric have to cost a lot.  Try going to upholstery fabric stores.  They always seem to have fabric on sale.  Or, outlet fabric stores if you live near a big city.  Instead of surfing the web try surfing your yellow pages.  Take the kids and made an outing of it to find just the right medieval costume for everyone in your family.

 No links tonight—just tips.  Next I will direct you to some great links for making

 Have fun! from your Faithful Scribe, Linda
Publisher of www.TheMedievalChronicle.com

St. Brigid’s Cross ~ Arts & Crafts Medieval Style

August 31, 2010

Good eventide to you all!

How would you like to make a cross?  St. Brigid’s Cross to be exact.  Here’s a nice easy-to-follow video.  Please go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMj7RJDwp8U

Brigid of Kildare is an Irish saint that lived around the middle of the 5th century.  Next to St. Patrick who baptized her she is considered one of Ireland’s greatest saints.  It is believed that St Brigid made the cross while seating at the bedside of a dying man.   His household was Christian and wanted him to give his life over to Christ before dying.  When St. Brigid arrived at his house he was delirious and unreachable.  Impossible to quite, she reached down and began to fashion a cross from the floor rushes.  After some time the man quieted and asked what she was doing.  When he saw the cross and heard Jesus’ story he gave his life to Christ.  Her feast day is February 1st and the St. Brigid Cross is made and hung over doorways to prevent fire from consuming the house.  Please visit Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigid’s_cross  to see a picture of the cross and read a wee bit more about one of Ireland’s patron saints. 

Enjoy! from your Faithful Scribe, Linda
Publisher of www.TheMedievalChronicle.com

Arts & Crafts ~ Medieval Style & Phrases and Origins too!

August 11, 2010

Good eventide to you all!

Let’s bake some bread.  Please visit http://whirlwind-design.com/madbaker/breadfaq.html#Q3 for a medieval recipe that can be used today.  Scroll up to the top of the page for some interesting facts about medieval breads.

Bread was a staple in medieval households.  It was either baked at home or purchased from the local baker.  Now buying from your local baker could empty your coin purse fast because many bakers were dishonest.  Because bread was a staple, bakers begin charging overly much for bread and cheating the public.  It got to the point where the public outcry reached the king and a law was levied that bakers were to stop cheating or face the penalties.  In order to be on the safe side of the law bakers began adding an extra loaf bringing the number of loaves to 13 or A Baker’s Dozen.  To read up on the origin of the phrase please visit http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/Bakers%20dozen.html .

Enjoy! from your Faithful Scribe, Linda
Publisher of www.TheMedievalChronicle.com

Rope Making – Arts & Crafts Medieval Style

July 20, 2010

Good eventide to you!

This week’s Arts & Crafts Medieval Style is all about rope making.  The website I’m inviting you to visit not only tells you how to make a rope but gives a history as well.  It says there was a “Guild of rope makers in London at least as early as 1328. The record shows that in that year five men were elected and sworn to govern the ministry of Corders.”  Have fun and let me know what you think if you try out their instructions.  If you have your own way of making a rope please share by commenting below.  Do visit http://www.angelfire.com/journal/millbuilder/rope.html

Enjoy! from your Faithful Scribe, Linda
Publisher of www.TheMedievalChronicle.com

Cooking ~ Medieval Style ~ A True Arts & Crafts

July 13, 2010

Good eventide to you all!

This week’s Arts & Crafts Medieval Style is all about cooking. I know, you really don’t think of cooking when you think of arts & crafts. But I do. You see, cooking isn’t exactly on my list of things I enjoy doing. In fact, I will avoid it if at all possible! Oh, I know how to cook and have been known to ‘invent’ my own recipes in the past and, to my surprise they were well received and have been asked for more than once over the years. But I digress… Cooking is indeed an art and the best chefs are true artists. Not just in cooking but in presentation. Want to have a cushy job for life? Be a cook who not only has a smooth running kitchen but one who can prepare a fantastic meal on short notice. Not to mention a banquet fit for a king and queen. Good medieval cooks were treasures and well respected within the household they served.

I’ve found two websites full of medieval recipes that have been converted for our modern day kitchen and supplies. You’ll also find menus. Do visit http://www.medievalcookery.com/recipes/index_england.html  and http://www.godecookery.com/friends/friends.htm#breads  and let me know what you think.

I must admit that looking for cooking websites of interest did indeed get me to thinking about cooking. Not the preparing side of cooking; the eating side!

Enjoy! from your Faithful Scribe, Linda
Publisher of www.TheMedievalChronicle.com

Herbs for Dyeing ~ Arts & Crafts Medieval Style

July 7, 2010

Good eventide to you!

In the Middle Ages herbs had many different uses (to season food, for medicine, keep cloths smelling good, keeps insects away, freshen rushes, etc) but for our purposes today we’re going to visit a website that tells how to use herbs to dye cloth.  Although I haven’t tried their suggestions, they sound easy enough and well worth the fun time you just may have.  Fair warning…  take care as the color may stay on the skin for a while!  Do visit http://gardening.about.com/od/herbsspecificplants1/a/Dye_Herbs.htm.  Another website that shows color variations is http://omved.com/our-products/vastra/herbs-we-use-to-dye-our-organic-fabric.   If you really want to get into the act here’s a website that tells you what herbs to grow: http://herbgardens.about.com/od/herbalgardendesign/a/Dyersherbs.htm.  You’ll also find lots of other suggestions pertaining to herbs used for dyeing.

I will confess that one of my dreams is to have an olde world herb garden.  Not only are they functional but they are pretty and can smell oh so nice!

Enjoy! from your Faithful Scribe, Linda
Publisher of www.TheMedievalChronicle.com

Candle Making ~ Medieval Style

June 29, 2010

Good day to you all!

Today I’m starting a new category entitled Arts and Crafts ~ Medieval Style.  I’ll be giving you links to how to make all things medieval.  With some of the links you will be creating from scratch and with some you’ll be making medieval-looking items. 

Our first link is how to make medieval looking candles.  Please visit at http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to-make-medieval-tissue-transferred-candles-333700/  This is a video that is easy to follow and fun to do.  If you want to make your own candles please visit http://www.cajuncandles.com/beginners-guide-to-candle-making.html  I haven’t made my own candles so if you follow their instructions please let me know what you think. 

I invite you to share your favorite websites for making all things medieval by leaving a comment below. 

Enjoy! from your Faithful Scribe, Linda
Publisher of www.TheMedievalChronicle.com